Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Thursday 22 November 2018

Brighton Joins Project To Create UK-Wide Portrait Of Remembered Dances

Award-winning performance company Quarantine and Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts bring Wallflower to Brighton this weekend, asking performers, audiences and the public 'can you remember every dance you've ever danced'?

Wallflower is a marathon of dance and memory. It's a game that alters according to the players.
 
The people on stage in Wallflower are trying to remember every dance they've ever danced. 

Some of them are professional dancers, some are not. Some might tell you that they can't dance at all.
 
Quarantine have been in Brighton this month asking local residents to share their remembered dances. 

Records of these dances have been collected on a dedicated website – alongside remembered dances from across the UK – and will be displayed at Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts for those attending the performances this weekend (23-24 November 2018).

Spanning a lifetime of music, fashion, politics, friendships, parties, love and loss, Wallflower is a show about how dancing can shape our lives.

There are memories of dancing alone all night at a party; of whirling across the stage at the Paris Opera Ballet; of silently, slowly revolving with a new lover on a canal boat at night; of a repeated tic - a bodily habit that feels like dancing; of walking alongside their mother; of racing with a dog across a beach; of dizzily spinning children; of weeping and dancing; of hitting the mark for Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker.

On stage is a DJ, a disco-ball and a single chair. A performer sits in the audience, documenting every memory. To date over 2,000 dances have been recorded and added to an ever-expanding archive. 

The dances collected in Brighton include:

** A dance from Aden (Southern Yemen) where Laila and her family would dance together all the time. Here, in Brighton, sometimes she listens to the music of Faisal Alawi and dances it with herself.

** Terry, in his kitchen now in Kemptown, remembering a dance from 15 years ago in his kitchen then in Hackney, with his 2-year old granddaughter Jae. He had to play the song (Prince"s Raspberry Beret) again and again, because every time it finished she said "more".  

** Jonathan remembering a dance that, performed with a plastic ostrich, involved the ugliest (and most joyful) shoes he has ever owned.

** Elly's 'I've got a phone in my wallet" dance, performed at the same time in five different cities beginning with B: Brooklyn, Belgrade, Bristol, Berlin and Brighton.

** Charlotte and Richard waltzing on the Brighton seafront, under the stars, to the sound of a solo concertina player.  

** Sally, shared a dance of herself as a 17-year old dancing with absolute abandon for the very first time to I feel free by Cream.

** Marco shared his first dance with his now husband, in London, on New Year's Eve 1993/1994. Marco is hearing and Italian. John is deaf and English. This dance was the beginning of them finding a common language together.

Wallflower director Richard Gregory said: 

"As we look at the portrait of another, we might also somehow see ourselves. I'm drawn to the difference between what we think we"re showing and how we're being seen. 

"Dance appears to be a potent way to do this – it's familiar to us all, whether we choose to sit on the sidelines or jump right in."

Wallflower at Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts on 23rd November: 8pm-9.30pm and 24th November 2018: 3.30pm-8.30pm. For more info CLICK HERE

by: Mike Cobley




Share    

credit Andy Willsher

Musician and songwriter Andy Burrows and bestselling Hove-based author Matt Haig, whose friendship blossomed after they 'met' on Twitter, have spent the past year passing ideas back and forth to create a collection of songs loosely inspired by Haig's books.

Maverick Sabre's third album When I Wake Up is an acutely personal and poignant body of work from the songwriter and artist and includes guest appearances from Jorja Smith and Chronixx.

The London born, Brighton raised and BBC Sound 2019 Nominated singer Grace Carter found through music the strength to speak out, to face down heartbreak and forge something transformative from the pain. 
Photo credit: Sarah Millican

Comedian and writer Sarah Millican has just finished a year-long sell-out tour, including two dates at Brighton Dome, where she encouraged her audiences to make a donation to the Samaritans through bucket collections after every single show.

At 65 years old, and with an incurable illness, award-winning comedy writer Paul Mayhew-Archer decided to go to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2018 to do something he'd never done before: perform a one-man comedy show.

Canadian alt-rockers Dilly Dally's latest long-playing release, Heaven, rose from the ashes after the four-piece almost decided to call it quits following the rigorous cycle around their much-loved debut, Sore. 
Pic by Grant

Winner of the first ever Women of the World Poetry Slam in 2008, Andrea Gibson remains one of the most captivating performers in the spoken word poetry scene today. 

Ian McKellen is to celebrate his 80th birthday next year by raising funds for theatres, with a new solo show which will play on 80 stages across the UK, including Theatre Royal Brighton.

Last weekend Brighton & Hove Green Party began collecting donations of clothes, food and toiletries for a range of local charitable organisations which support the city's most vulnerable residents

The Turner Prize-nominated visual artist David Shrigley has created a personalised artwork to help raise funds for the Brighton Dome's refurbishment project.

The much anticipated Christmas Queens, at Brighton Dome Concert Hall, began via a video montage of some of the most famous and popular queens from all ten seasons of RuPaul's Drag Race.

After a successful inaugural outing this summer, Black Deer returns in 2019 for a three day celebration of Americana and Country at the Eridge Deer Park in Kent. 

Wave's inaugural podcast festival - which includes podcasts from lifestyle to film to comedy to music - is set to take place across a range of venues in Brighton.
(c) The Unthanks 2018

The Emily Brontë Song Cycle is a new work commissioned by the Brontë Society, written and recorded using Emily Brontë’s piano in her home, by composer, pianist and producer Adrian McNally of the band The Unthanks, and performed with sisters Rachel & Becky Unthank.

Archive search

Search our archives for what's on and gone for the best of this city's theatre music comedy news and much more...







Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd