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Thursday 20 December 2018

Horrible Histories Author Reveals All On Those Terrible Tudors & Awful Egyptians Coming To Theatre Royal Brighton

Horrible Histories author Terry Deary took time out to answer questions ahead of Horrible Histories Live On Stage, which is coming to Brighton early next year.


In Terrible Tudors take a trip through the horrible Henries to the end of evil Elizabeth and hear the legend (and the lies!) about the torturing Tudors. 

Find out the fate of Henry's headless wives and his punch up with the Pope. Meet Bloody Mary and see Ed fall dead in his bed. Survive the Spanish Armada as it sails into the audience!

Awful Egyptians invites you to meet the fascinating Pharaohs, gasp at the power of the pyramids and discover the foul facts of death and decay with the meanest mummies in Egypt. 

Are you ready to rumble with Ramesses the Great? Dare you enter through the Gates of the Afterlife? It's the history of Egypt with the nasty bits left in!

A special feature of the productions are the amazing 3D effects called Bogglevision! 

Among an array of 3D illusions the audience will see the Spanish Armada firing cannonballs into the auditorium and the Mummy reaching out to grab them!
 
Horrible Histories Live on Stage is written by Terry Deary from his bestselling Horrible Histories books. 

Terry Deary is the world's bestselling non-fiction author for children and one of the most popular children"s authors in the country. 

Terry Deary on recording history & dramatic licence

Q: When you wrote your first Horrible Histories did you ever imagine the idea would go on to be so successful?

Terry Deary (TD): Yes, I think most authors believe their work will be a huge success even though most books disappear from print after a couple of months. It's that hope that keeps us going. When I wrote my very first fiction book 38 years ago my publisher said, 'writing is like a sausage machine and you have to keep stuffing in at one end so something comes out the other end – it is like a process'. I kept writing book after book – fifty fiction titles before HH came along - but I never imagined I would have a series which would become first of all iconic and secondly that would still be selling 25 years later. Roald Dahl has managed that, but I can't think of anyone else who is still selling so well. What usually happens is that people have sensational ideas and they sell really well for a while but they do tend to come and go. It is a shame you can't predict which are the ones that will last!

Q: What do you believe is behind the popularity of Horrible Histories?

(TD): Nobody had done anything like them before and they filled a desperate need. There were fact books for children but they tended to be written by experts on the subject. They knew their history but they didn't have a clue how to write about it for children. So with Horrible Histories, instead of an expert who couldn't write, they approached a children"s author who knew nothing about history. I get all my facts from research. I do my research and say 'you will never guess what I discovered' and 'phwoar, this is great'. It is actually a simple answer. I say I am not an expert in history and this is why they work. Down the years people have tried to copy Horrible Histories by doing funny fact books but they never get it right because they use experts not writers.

Q: Have you ever found any facts which were too horrible to include?

(TD): Well the publishers have said so. For example when the Vikings invaded they became settlers and had families here. But these settlers were as vicious as the Vikings and when they invaded a Viking village they would find a Viking child, swing it by its legs and bash its brains out. But when I told the publishers they said 'we can't have that' which is strange as I can"t see it is any worse than some of the other parts which have been included.

On the other hand there are facts which some people feel you can't talk about, say in World War Two. For example when we came to the television series, we were sitting round the table and we talked all about the bombings and the Blackout and got that sorted. Then we got to the Holocaust and there were six or seven pages and they read them in silence and then said 'of course we can"t do that'. I am actually quite proud of the fact that television can"t do the Holocaust but I can.

When I went to school it was all about the Romans. It was the Romans who brought civilisation, the Romans who gave us water supplies and aqueducts, the Romans who brought us straight roads – that is what they told us all the time. But the Romans were the most evil people there were. They are the only people who killed people for sport. Thousands of them would go to an arena and watch people killed for sport and they are held up as models of civilisation. And, because teachers are telling them that, children grow up thinking the Romans were really civilised. Horrible Histories tell the truths that, in the past, teachers have cut out from history. 

Q: Why do Horrible Histories work so well on stage?

(TD): We work really well as a team. BSC actor/director Neal Foster is very knowledgeable and experienced in children's theatre. BSC has been going for 25 years now. I have been a professional actor for 40 years. So, between us, we know what we are doing. We are not trying to write literary stuff. It isn't the books on stage, we are not determined to be true to the spirit of the books, we are writing for theatre. So it is fresh and original.

Q: So what next for Terry Deary?

(TD): I have now created adult history books in a new series called "Dangerous Days". The first was entitled "Dangerous Days in the Roman Empire" followed two years ago by books on Victorian Railways, Elizabeth I and Ancient Egypt. They have a layer of humour and are a bit gruesome. They are more or less Horrible Histories for adults but we can never ever use that title. There will also be new Horrible Histories titles while I'm planning movies and television series based on my adult books and my fiction. 

Q: After all this research are you now an accidental history expert?

(TD): Definitely not. I know very little about history because I can't keep it all in my brain. I have only got about three brain cells. I often forget what I have written because I can't hold all those facts. I pick up a Horrible Histories book, maybe to revise it, and I read something and think 'I never knew that!'

But I can be an anorak with facts. I was watching Horrible Histories on television and up came the Vile Victorians and along came Burke and Hare, the body snatchers. And I was jumping up and down and shouting at the television 'no, they were 1827 – 12 years before Victoria came to the throne. They weren't Vile Victorians!' Now that is anorak.

Horrible Histories - featuring Terrible Tudors and Awful Egyptians - at Theatre Royal Brighton from Wednesday 30th January to Saturday 2nd February 2019. CLICK HERE for tickets.

by: Mike Cobley & Diane Parkes




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