Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Saturday 22 June 2019

The Futureheads: First New Album In Seven Years Made By Four People In It For All The Right Reasons

The Futureheads, who played Concorde 2, Brighton, last month, are set to release Powers, their sixth studio album and their first electric guitar release in almost a decade.  
Credit Andy Sturmey

Recorded and self-produced Powers is a record that looks "at the balance of power in a personal, political and relational sense." 

Having first emerged at the start of the '00s amidst a burgeoning swarm of guitar bands, the Sunderland quartet, with their proud regional accents and spiky, playful sensibilities, stuck out from the off. 

Over the following decade The Futureheads – comprised of vocalists and guitarists Barry Hyde and Ross Millard, vocalist and bassist David 'Jaff' Craig and vocalist and drummer Dave Hyde – amassed five critically-acclaimed albums and headlined countless tours.

Returning with Powers, the band's aim is one of forward motion not nostalgia; though the quartet could probably rely on the successes of old to push them through the next couple of festival seasons, that isn't – and hasn't ever – been the point. 


"Obviously it's an absolute privilege to come back and still have fans and that's something to cherish," says Ross says.

"But I also think we've got a bit of a job to do about letting people know that there's more to this band than you might have thought."

It's a risky statement, but one that's confirmed immediately once you press play. 

Across the album, the band push further, melodically and lyrically, than ever before; there's no safety net here, but a band putting everything out there and driving it to the wire again. 

"I love the thing Bowie said about how an artist should be slightly out of their depth because that's when you get the good stuff," Barry affirms. 

"Or as David Lynch says, 'If you want to catch the big fish, you've got to go deep.'"   

The album's propulsive, scattershot lead single Jekyll comes laden with a self-professed "monstrous riff for monstrous, preposterous times", but it's perhaps the stream-of-consciousness, spoken word diatribe of Across the Border that lands the biggest hammer-blow in terms of unapologetic, outraged social commentary. 

"As a band, we were always interested in personal politics and behaviour, but we never spoke about the state of the nation or big picture politics," Ross begins. 

"But in the meantime the world"s changed so much and there are things to really kick against. 

"We live in a region that's somehow or other been tagged as the poster boy for Brexit, and the misinformation and aggression that this referendum has brought out in people has become a really terrifying thing that I haven't seen in my lifetime. 

"It's a defining moment in British politics that"s impossible to ignore if you're making art." 

Powers is a record that sounds invigorated, with something important to say and an idiosyncratic, exciting way of saying it, made by four people here for all the right reasons. 

"There's power and sophistication and simplicity, and it's bloody hard to play, which I think will keep the shows interesting because we're on the edge of our abilities with this," grins Barry. 

"It's musical audacity: that's what this album's about." 

The Futureheads new album 'Power' is out on 30th August 2019. CLICK HERE for more details.

by: Mike Cobley



Related links

The Futureheads

Share    

Credit Andy Sturmey

Taking place this weekend, Saturday 4th July 4th & Sunday 5th July, on what would have been the 2020 festival weekend, the Jazz FM's output will include live recordings from the Sussex-based, Love Supreme Jazz Festival

Creature Creature can, via the imminent release of their first collection of self-penned tracks, Two Finger Tantrum, be labelled the new flag bearers of rock. The Brighton-based five piece have furrowed a new burrow at the summit of an age old genre. With this debut album they will be looking over their shoulders at the also-rans for many years to come.


Returning after four years away, Aidan Knight's penchant for astute observations and personal reflections remains a compelling component of his songwriting.

Credit Nicole Nodland

On Sunset, Paul Weller's fifteenth solo album, which drops this Friday, sees one of the UK's most successful songwriters barely affected by the present situation that has placed the music industry, as much as the wider economy, largely on pause: “I haven't really been bothered by the lockdown, other than having to queue for food or medicine.” 

Extinction Rebellion Brighton are 'delighted' that Brighton and Hove Council have won £663,000 in government funding to increase space for active travel in the city.
'In Monochrome' Artwork

Of all the formative experiences Stonehaven musician Fair Mothers, AKA Kevin Allan, had while growing up, reading The Stranger, by Albert Camus, stands out.

Katie Elfer & ‘I Want to be Red'

Few people miss the daily commute, as many employees switch to home working to tackle Covid-19. Katie Elfer, a regular train passenger from Brighton, used the journey time to write her first children's book which has just been published.

Moy wrote and recorded second single No Talk's The Best Chat at the height of lockdown. Separated from his regular band, he discovered that collaborating on the track remotely was an unorthodox creative method given the live energy that's usually key to their work together.

As fierce as the changeable weather itself, the ethereal tones of Serbian-Canadian musician Dana Gavanski can stir a breeze and destroy like a storm

The ominous, fuzzed-out tone of a single guitar note. A foreboding piano line. Esther Swift's haunting, intricate harp. All of these combine to devastating effect on Harpy, a dark, swirling tale about facing up to what you've become with unflinching honesty, and the first single taken from Stonehaven musician Fair Mothers' new album. In Monochrome.

Every summer, towns and cities across the UK including Brighton are filled with LGBTQ+ people celebrating Pride, but this year that wasn't going to happen - until now.

Cat Walker is a Brighton-based author, who, having lived and travelled all over the world, has come to rest (for now) in sunny Saltdean, where she lives with her wife and baby son. 

Archive search

Search our archives for what's on and gone for the best of this city's theatre music comedy news and much more...







Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd