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Thursday 01 November 2018

Brighton-Based Music Charity Launches Initiative To Align Local Businesses With Young Artists

Brighton's new Holler Brewery oversaw the launch of AudioActive's latest initiative in its manifesto to provide a solid foundation for local grassroots talent.
AudioActive Patron Rag’n’Bone Man at The Movement Launch

Aptly christened The Movement, this new enterprise aligns progressive local businesses with the vast array of young artists that keep the urban music scene burning bright, to provide regular funding that will safeguard the future for this cast of talented raconteurs.

And already it's flourishing.

Two future-minded businesses within the Brighton community that are leading the way as early advocates of the cause are Holler and Fatto A Mano.

As such, Holler's contemporary space, situated in the heart of Brighton's London Road area, was a pertinent launchpad from which to set The Movement in motion. 

At the core of proceedings was AudioActive's masterly cast of artists, who provided the fireworks via their own inimitable soundtrack to the city.

AudioActive's ever-present patron Rory Graham – a.k.a. Rag'n'Bone Man – was in attendance to introduce such bright lights as AudioActive's alumnus Phonetic, currently making waves in the British hip hop scene; the immensely gifted Boudicca Pepper, whose blend of hip hop and silky tones has the ability to drop jaws, and a slick sparring session from opening act Bador.  


"The talent performing on the night was incredible," states Rupert Davidson, first to sign up to The Movement. 

"As Fatto a Mano and Holler Brewery, we've been blown away by AudioActive"s impact at the grassroots in our community. Join The Movement."

While grants and funding provide organisations such as AudioActive with much-needed revenue, initiatives such as The Movement provide the nuts and bolts. 

Fixed donations cover the day-to-day running costs needed to keep AudioActive's many projects alive – from the Kustom Vibes monthly showcase and pioneering Electric Youth Ensemble through to equipment that's vital to keep the music coming.

In short, The Movement is about local businesses that are committed to making a difference within their communities and, by signing up, they are safeguarding the future for young talent.

In an Ode To AudioActive, rapper EbenFlo states: 

"We are a community of catalysts... AudioActive is our life support machine/ Filling us to the brim with thoughts and dreams/ While forging the music scene/ We are one big team, not just musically – and the goal is unity."

In the words of EbenFlo, this truly is 'a community of catalysts'

Those wishing to sign up to The Movement should log on to the AudioActive Supporter"s Page at http://audioactive.org.uk/our-supporters or contact adam@audioactive.com. Monthly donations start from as little as £5, up to a maximum of £500.

by: Mike Cobley




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Photo credit: Sante D'Orazio

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