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Tuesday 08 October 2019

Young Enough: NYC's Charly Bliss Make Return Visit To Brighton In Support Of Critically Acclaimed Second Album

Charly Bliss, the American four-piece band - who have traded their brash punk persona for a more thoughtful pop sound - make a welcome return Brighton, following a well received appearance at the city's Great Escape Festival, back in May.

On the their most recent album, this spring's Young Enough, the band challenged each other to be exposed, to be seen for who they really are as people, and then to double down on the sound that emerged from that process. 

It's the story of the band's evolution from the scrappy upstarts who made 2017's brash punk LP Guppy, to the confident, assured artists behind the comparatively dynamic, unapologetically pop of Young Enough

The album's title track has been released and Eva Hendricks (lead vocals & guitar) explains the reasoning behind the track's lyrical content:

"For so many reasons, "Young Enough" is the centrepiece of this album. 

"This is a song about perspective, nostalgia and growing up. 

"The first time that I fell in love it was tumultuous and frustrating, but I think all of the endless drama made me believe that it was 'worth it.'

"Sort of like the Twilight-movie trope that relationships that are the most painful are the most romantic. 

"Instead of writing about it through the lens of anger and frustration, I wanted to write a song that was really honest about the fact that I really loved this person, and regardless of how messy it was and how immature we both were, I was both grateful for the experience but also grateful that I've grown up and out of believing that being in love should be so hard." 


Eva is also happy to explain the reasoning behind the making of the video that accompanies, Young Enough:

"This video is so magical and unlike anything we've ever made before. 

"I told (director) Henry Kaplan that I was feeling inspired by the video for Running Up That Hill by Kate Bush, and he took that initial idea and made something totally beautiful and unique that's as cinematic and sentimental as the song.

"Despite the fact that this video looks so dreamlike and serene, it was very physically draining to make. 

"The entire crew and anyone who wasn"t in a given shot had to sprint behind the steadicam op so that they wouldn"t be seen and ruin the effect of the giant open field where we were shooting. 

"Between that, the choreography, racing to utilize available daylight, speeding up and slowing down the track to achieve the slow-motion and fast-motion effects, and trying to get perfect, full takes because there's so few cuts, this was an extremely challenging video to make, but for that reason it"s also our favourite."

Earlier this year Charly Bliss shared a video for the anthemic Young Enough album track, Hard To Believe.

While the video is a playful homage to A Perfect Circle's Judith, of the song Eva Hendricks says: 

"The guitar riff in 'Hard to Believe' is one of the first parts that was written for 'Young Enough'. 

"We loved it so much that we would end every practice by playing it over and over again until we finally decided to turn it into a fully formed song. 

"Lyrically, it's about being addicted to a bad relationship, and the endless cycle of trying and failing to end one."

"I don't know why it's easiest for me to frame the darkest lyrics in the context of upbeat songs.  


"It's completely instinctual and not something I ever plan out. It sort of mirrors how I am, and maybe it's a way of protecting myself. 

"In my opinion, the two best emotional releases are crying and dancing, so it makes sense to me to marry the two."

Many of the singer's Young Enough lyrics were inspired by a past abusive relationship, one that had Eva - as such relationships are designed to do - doubting herself on many levels.

Songwriting, which "wasn't something that I grew up thinking I could do," as she puts it, became a new source of respite, and, eventually, of redemption. 

"You go through experiences of loss or extreme pain and you just keep moving," Eva says. 

"You look around and wonder, how has the world not stopped? But it's also powerful. 

"I'm still here, I'm not a person who is ruled by pain, I still like who I am." 

Charly Bliss play Pattern, Brighton, on Monday 4th November 2019. CLICK HERE for tickets.

by: Mike Cobley




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