Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Thursday 04 July 2019

Jazz Re:Fest Is Set To Showcase Emerging & Underexposed Talent @ Brighton Dome Concert Hall

Jazz Re:Fest at Brighton Dome prides itself on giving a platform to some of the dopest live music around, especially showcasing emerging and underexposed talent – this year will be no exception. 

In addition to live performances, there will be a selection of contemporary DJ's, playing music that connects the dots between jazz and other genres. 

The festival line-up is led by one of the stalwarts of the London jazz scene, tuba player and composer Theon Cross, who made a name for himself both as a member of the Mercury-nominated and award-winning quartet Sons of Kemet, as well as his own powerful and eclectic solo material. 

Having appeared on a number of highly acclaimed releases including the lauded, We Out Here, and leading his own powerful and eclectic group where he's flanked by other strong emerging voices.

Joining the line-up is eloquent and provocative singer-songwriter, Zara McFarlene, the UK's foremost Black British jazz vocalist. 

With two albums to her name, she inhabits an unusual musical landscape, fearlessly exploring original material and reworking well known classics from the worlds of jazz and Jamaican music. 

Following the release of Rosie Turton's 5ive via Jazz re:freshed, up-and-coming UK jazz musician Rosie Turton performs this year. 


Having previously studied at Trinity College London, Turton has expressed herself through a variety of different musical outlets, from composing and playing with septet Nerija (Domino Recording Co) to recording with Jitwam and Hollie Cook. 

Her most recent album blends trombone, violin and electronics over a bed of interlocking grooves and soundscapes, exploring jazz, hip-hop and classical Indian music. 

With three albums, four features on Moses Boyd's hit album Displaced Diaspora and performances from all around the globe under his belt, Alto-saxophonist and percussionist Kevin Haynes Grupo Elegua joins this year's line-up. 

His extraordinary musicianship fuses contemporary jazz with influences drawn from Afro-Cuban and Nigerian Yoruba folkloric Bata drumming styles, alongside Mandiga folk and praise songs with a hard bop modal concepts and flowing Kora lines, creating a unique sound in African jazz-based music.

Having grown up in London in a strongly musical family, Sarah Tandy turned to jazz music at the age of 20, listening to the likes of Coltrane, McCoy Tyner and Herbie Hancock. 

After religiously attending weekly jam sessions at the legendary Ronnie Scott"s Club and serving a residency at Servant Jazz Quarters in Dalston where she met her band, Tandy's career as a musician flourished. 

She now performs alongside a band of mixed personalities, reflected in their music to accommodate every member"s individual musical temperament. 

Having signed to Brighton-based label Tru Thoughts early on in his career which saw the release of an EP and his debut album, Werkha has been on a playful exploration in the development of his musical style. 

His early musicianship was described as "oozing with creative flair, vibrancy and musical craftmanship" and this mode of play has translated effortlessly into his vivaciously curated live shows, which blends some of the UK's most exciting jazz musicians into the mix with his own instrumental, DJ and sampling informed abilities. 

Completing this year"s line-up is Nigerian musician Camilla George, whose early interest in the saxophone led her to go on to study with many jazz greats like Jean Toussain; join the award-winning band Jazz Jamaica and form her own critically acclaimed project showcasing the stars of the new UK jazz scene. 

Her love of fusing African and Western music has earned George two critically acclaimed albums, presenting her unique style blending Afrofuturism, hip-hop and jazz. 

Jazz Re:Fest at Brighton Dome on Saturday 27 July 2019, 12pm-8pm. For details CLICK HERE.

by: Mike Cobley




Share    


Originally conceived as a solo project by Siobhan Fahey, Shakespears Sister were thus born by a one-time punk turned chart-pop singer who left girl-group Bananarama in the late eighties.

Accidents, heartbreak and a career curse plagued Brighton-duo Blood Red Shoes on the road to their new LP, the appropriately and knowingly-titled, Get Tragic. 

Lemon Jelly producer Fred Deakin's The Lasters is an ambitious new solo project inspired by classic concept albums like The Who's Quadrophenia and Jeff Wayne's The War of the Worlds.

Having just got off the road from supporting Pixies, The Big Moon will be heading to Brighton, early next year, in support of new album, Walking Like We Do.

In Daniel Rachel's book Walls Come Tumbling Down, he reports that on 5th August 1976, on stage at the Birmingham Odeon, a drunk Eric Clapton harangued an audience of 2,000 rock fans. 
Credit Helen Murray

It is the part that restarted Laurence Olivier's career. Corin Redgrave performed it late on in life. Michael Gambon did so on screen. Three years ago, Kenneth Branagh took it on in the West End. Now, this autumn, it's Shane Richie's turn ..

You will have seen Henry Paker's name whizz by as a writer on the credits of a huge variety of comedy shows, from Michael McIntyre's Big Show, Eight Out Of Ten Cats, and Mock The Week all the way to Comic Relief and Top Gear. 

The University of Brighton will launch Brighton CCA, the first major new contemporary arts gallery in the city for twenty years, on Saturday 19th October 2019. 

At a time when LGBTQ+ education in schools is being protested; when the scourge of anti-Semitism is rearing its head on the political left as well as the right; Jewish graves desecrated with swastikas and religious and queer people are attacked in their community spaces – Becoming Electra presents an uplifting, challenging and hopeful story of a proud, queer Jewish girl finding her voice.
(c) The Unthanks 2018

The Emily Brontë Song Cycle is a work commissioned by the Brontë Society, written and recorded using Emily Brontë’s piano in her home, by composer, pianist and producer Adrian McNally of the band The Unthanks, and performed with sisters Rachel & Becky Unthank.
Credit Philippa Barr

‘Children are curious and accepting. Teaching them that "different" is not bad is key to the eradication of forms of hate, not just homophobia. The question I often get asked is: "Are you a boy or a girl?". The answer I give is, "I am whatever you want me to be!" According to one boy, I'm now a unicorn.’
Credit Tommy Ga-Ken Wan

As Frankenstein arrives at Theatre Royal Brighton for a week of performances, Rona Munro discusses (below) her new adaptation of Mary Shelley's Gothic masterpiece which places the writer herself (depicted by Eilidh Loan) amongst the action, as she wrestles with her creation and with the stark realities facing revolutionary young women, then and now.

Archive search

Search our archives for what's on and gone for the best of this city's theatre music comedy news and much more...







Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd